How to create a poisonous milkshake in Manyland

Philipp sez, "Manyland.com is a shared universe right in the browser where we draw everything together. But how does it actually work? Here's an example: how to create a poisonous milkshake." Read the rest

Austin Grossman's YOU, now in paperback

Austin Grossman's 2013 novel YOU was a brilliant, mystical science fiction novel about game development and simulation (two subjects that Grossman knows plenty about, being a somewhat legendary game dev himself). Read the rest

Norman Bel Geddes, creator of the 1939 New York World's Fair Futurama

Writing in The Believer, B. Alexandra Szerlip offers a fascinating profile of Norman Bel Geddes, the man who built the Futurama at the 1939 New York Worlds' Fair. Read the rest

Excerpt: Yang & Liew's "The Shadow Hero"

Yesterday, I posted a review of Gene Luen Yang and Sonny Liew's wonderful new graphic novel The Shadow Hero, which supplies a backstory for The Green Turtle, the first Asian-American superhero, whose career was heretofore limited to five glorious issues in 1944. Read the rest

The Shadow Hero: giving an origin story to comics' first Asian-American superhero

Back in October 2013, I posted a video in which comics creator Gene Luen Yang introduced his next project, The Shadow Hero, a graphic novel that invents an origin story for The Green Turtle, the first-ever Asian-American superhero who featured in a short-lived, five-issue series in 1944. Read the rest

Jo Walton's "My Real Children": infinitely wise, sad and uplifting novel

Jo Walton's My Real Children literally kept me up all night, weeping uncontrollably with the most astounding mixture of joy and sorrow I have ever felt, but not able to stop until I'd finished it. Read the rest

My daughter Poesy reviews Hilda and the Black Hound (USA reprise)

Last month, I posted a review of Luke Pearson and London's Flying Eye Books have fourth Hildafolk kids' graphic novel, Hilda and the Black Hound that I collaborated on with my daughter. Read the rest

Afterlife With Archie: Archie Andrews, zombie hunter!

Back in March, I blogged the Afterlife with Archie comics, and suggested that you wait until the first collection of the series came out before digging into it (the singles were going for silly money). Read the rest

Exclusive excerpt: chapters one and two of Charlie Fletcher's The Oversight

Yesterday, I reviewed book one of The Oversight, the first spectacular volume in a new historical fantasy series by Charlie Fletcher. As I wrote then, it's "a dark and glinting book set in Victorian London, a fat and aggressively readable novel about a secret society -- the Oversight -- charged with the policing of all the magical and supranatural (yes, supranatural) elements of Britain. Read the rest

The Oversight: conspiracies, magic, and the end of the world

Charlie Fletcher's new novel The Oversight ships today. It's a dark and glinting book set in Victorian London, a fat and aggressively readable novel about a secret society -- the Oversight -- charged with the policing of all the magical and supranatural (yes, supranatural) elements of Britain. Read the rest

Excerpt: Jillian and Mariko Tamaki's "This One Summer"

Yesterday, I posted a review of Jillian and Mariko Tamaki's wonderful new young adult graphic novel This One Summer. Today, I'm proud to present an exclusive excerpt from the book, courtesy of the good people at First Second Books. Read the rest

Technical analysis of terrorist graphic/brand design

On We Make Money, Not Art, Regine has posted a long and fascinating review of the 2013 book Branding Terror. The Logotypes and Iconography of Insurgent Groups and Terrorist Organizations, which presents an unusually detailed analysis of the visual identity of terrorist and non-state-actor insurgent groups around the world and over time. Read the rest

Comic strip etched into a human hair

The folks behind EHSM2, the upcoming maker/hacker conference in Hamburg, have released a video of comic strip that has been etched into a human hair using a focused ion beam. Read the rest

This Day in Blogging History: London cops do a "terrorist" search every 3 mins; Blogs to be legally classed as weapons; Songs the Cramps covered

One year ago today London cops catch and search a potential terrorist every three minutes: That's a lot of potential terrorists! I'm sure glad they've all been made to turn out their pockets and surrender their dignity. Read the rest

White House's data report skips surveillance and privacy

Last week, I wrote about danah boyd's analysis of the White House's Big Data report [PDF]. Now, the Electronic Frontier Foundation has added its analysis to the discussion. Read the rest

Rubber Chicken Players coming to Toronto's Webfest 2014

Robbo sez, "Our silly little web series, The Rubber Chicken Players, has the honour of being an official selection at TO WebFest 2014. The festival is being held at the Harbourfront Centre from May 9th to the 11th, showcasing amazing shows from around the world in a huge range of genres - and there's going to be a late night theatre screening of Dr. Read the rest

This One Summer: young adult graphic novel, a brilliant coming-of-age

This One Summer is a beautiful, haunting young-adult graphic novel by Jillian and Mariko Tamaki, sisters from Toronto whose work spans media from prose to film to comics. Read the rest

More posts